THEMED SESSIONS

THEMED SESSION

Themed sessions deal with specific topics proposed by the sessions’ organizers and reviewed by the Organizing Committee.

  • « On invitation » sessions will host submissions made by authors who had been invited by the organizers to serve the EPIP 2017 conference themes and mission.
  • « Open » sessions will host submissions peer-reviewed by each session’s organizer, under advisement by the Organizing Committee.

The submission portal and deadline for all Themed Sessions are the same as for general submissions, namely: http://epip2017.org/index.php/submissions/; March 24, 2017. Accepted authors will also need to pay fees and register as indicated by the Organizing Committee.

The Organizing Committee reserves the right to cancel any session for which the agreed number of accepted submissions and speaker registrations has not been reached. Both Full Papers and Extended Abstracts will be accepted; excessively brief Abstracts will not be accepted. For any information please contact the sessions’ organizers directly at the emails given in the below descriptions.

ON INVITATION

Organizer: Prof. Martin Kretschmer (CREATe, University of Glasgow) – Martin.Kretschmer@glasgow.ac.uk; Prof. Bernt Hugenholtz P.B.Hugenholtz@uva.nl; Dr. Joost Poort J.P.Poort@uva.nl (both IViR, University of Amsterdam)

Summary information: We live in a world in which activities such as hyperlinking & embedding, news aggregation, text & data mining and private copying are ubiquitous. How should the copyright system deal with these evolving forms of “borderline” exploitation? Since September 2014 a group of European copyright scholars led by the Institute for Information Law (IViR) of the University of Amsterdam, in cooperation with CREATe, has been working on a research project into the reconstructing of the (economic) exploitation rights protected by copyright. The project seeks to develop new legal concepts and new avenues of thinking that better reflect today’s and tomorrow’s economic realities. The project is funded by a research grant from Microsoft Europe.

At the EPIP 2015 Conference in Glasgow, the researchers presented the ambitions of the research project and some preliminary directions. At the EPIP 2017 Conference in Bordeaux, the aim is to present the final outcomes of the project: a number of papers offering competing perspectives – albeit with considerable common ground – that will be published in 2017 in the Kluwer Information Law Series.

Submissions: Submissions are accepted only by authors who have been previously contacted by the organizers. All invited authors are required to submit by March 24, 2017 at http://epip2017.org/index.php/submissions/

Organizer: Prof. Anupam Chander (California International Law Center, UC Davis) – achander@ucdavis.edu

Summary information: In the vision of its early champions, the Internet freed individuals from the shackles of governments. But borders became evident early in the development of cyberspace. This panel will interrogate the bordered nature of cyberspace and, in particular, the efforts of particular countries to create a geography of cyberspace. Issues of surveillance have intensified efforts to introduce and affirm borders in cyberspace. Cases have tested whether American courts can reach out and grab information stored on servers in Europe. Efforts to assert digital sovereignty reflect concerns about privacy and security, and also economic development.

An array of the leading experts on global Internet regulation will examine intellectual property law, trade law, data protection law, and free speech law and policy. The experts offer an array of approaches—including law, economics, and public policy.

Submissions: Submissions are accepted only by authors who have been previously contacted by the organizers. All invited authors are required to submit by March 24, 2017 at http://epip2017.org/index.php/submissions/

Organizer: Prof Haochen Sun (Law and Technology Center, University of Hong Kong) – haochen.sun@hku.hk

Summary information: Recent movements on agendas such as access to knowledge and medicine and traditional knowledge have made social justice at the forefront of intellectual property research. This session aims to bring together internationally renowned scholars to explore the geography of social justice approaches to intellectual property. Talks will consider social justice issues in various countries from comparative law perspectives. They will also apply various economic, social, and political theories to re-examine how intellectual property law should be reshaped to promote social justice.

Submissions: Submissions are accepted only by authors who have been previously contacted by the organizers. All invited authors have to submit by March 24, 2017 at http://epip2017.org/index.php/submissions/

OPEN SESSIONS

Organizer: Dr Andrew Toole (Chief Economist Office, USPTO) – Andrew.Toole@uspto.gov

Summary information: Intellectual property (IP) offices around the world are experiencing rapid growth in new trademark filings, driven primarily by private firms. At the same time, new data sources and research-ready datasets on trademark registrations and ownership are being released by IP offices. Papers will discuss both new data sources and new research findings on the role and impact of trademarks on firm-level performance.

Submissions: Submissions are accepted from all interested scholars. Comparative studies will be given special consideration. Please submit by March 24, 2017 at http://epip2017.org/index.php/submissions/.

Organizer: Massimiliano Granieri (Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Brescia) – massimiliano.granieri@unibs.it

Summary information: The session will focus primarily on the role that intermediaries with diverse business models play to aggregate scattered intangible resources, mitigate anti-commons situations and trigger market transactions. While traditionally intermediaries have been related to trolls and IP assumed as mostly referred to patents, markets face intermediaries that do not merely assert aggressively their portfolios, but that also evolved their model to extract value from IP rights. Moreover, also other fields of IP, including copyrights and new plant varieties can be the playing field for intermediaries. Comparatively, in some geographic markets intermediaries work better and are instrumental to market integration. In other instances, they action is missing and markets remain underdeveloped.

Submissions: Submissions are accepted from legal, economic, managerial and sociological perspectives. Comparative studies will be given special consideration. Please submit by March 24, 2017 at http://epip2017.org/index.php/submissions/.

Organizers: Dr. Delphine Marie-Vivien (CIRAD-Vietnam) – delphine.marie-vivien@cirad.fr; Erik Thévenod-Mottet (Swiss Institute of Intellectual Property) – erik.thevenod@ipi.ch

Summary information: Many signs show that the local and global situation of geographical indications (GIs) are coming to a major turning point. During the last few decades, the legal debates on GIs were mainly limited between two approaches, namely sui generis and trademark systems, and on the specific situations of a few well-known, large-scaled and globally traded goods. Now, this very politically sensitive Intellectual Property Right (IPR) is about to achieve its globalization in terms of elaboration of domestic legal frameworks in many countries that enable an increasing trend of GIs registration. However, new stakes and debates question the perspective of an improvement of harmonization of the legal concept at the international level, an important issue for global trade.

The session will particularly stress the following dimensions:

  • Are international agreements establishing a distinct legal framework for GIs, with respect to other IPRs?
  • The role of WTO and WIPO
  •  GIs in South and New World countries: control, certification, repression of frauds.
  • Legal concept of GI: international harmonization or national diversity? What right holders?
  • GIs: individual/collective brands or quality standard?
  • GIs and innovation, environment, biodiversity, food standards, and culture.

Submissions: Submissions are accepted from legal, economic, managerial and sociological perspectives. Comparative studies will be given special consideration. Please submit by March 24, 2017 at http://epip2017.org/index.php/submissions/.

Organizers: Marie Coris (GREThA – Bordeaux University); Julien Pénin (BETA – Strasbourg University) – Contact: marina.flamand@u-bordeaux.fr

Summary information: Patents are increasingly used as a source of strategic information, especially for policy and business decision makers, based both on open sources and commercial datasets. Recently, issues related to the management of collaborative innovation have resulted in the appearance of new expectations for patent analysis as tools for technological intelligence. Patent databases can be used, for instance, to identify potential collaborators or additional opportunities to valorize a technology, based, among other things, on contents analysis, citation analysis, and network analysis of applicants and inventors. The continuous increase in the number of patents, the heterogeneity of the rules between patent offices as well as the development of strategic patenting behaviour stand as the main obstacles to technological intelligence.

The aim of this session is to improve our understanding of the use of patent data for business intelligence and decision making. We call upon new research aimed at the development of new methods and mapping tools for business intelligence, studies on the link between applicants’ strategic behaviour and patent information, case studies of best practices of patent information analysis for innovation management.

Submissions: Please submit by March 24, 2017 at http://epip2017.org/index.php/submissions/.